TFEC: Member Publications and Research

Measuring the Bending Yield Strength of Timber Frame Pegs
The design of traditional timber frame connections relies heavily on the use of wood pegs to resist shear forces. Wood pegs differ from the metal fasteners traditionally used in the National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) by having lower strength and stiffness properties and including a fifth yield mode in the design equations (TFEC 2010, AWC 2015). An interesting advantage of the lower strength of pegs is the ability to reduce the spacing requirements used for steel fasteners. One of the key properties in the design of wood peg connections is the dowel bending yield strength, Fyb. This term is present in both Mode III and IV yield limit equations in the NDS.
994.33 KB. Published on Feb 3, 2017.


Cross Laminated Timber
5.16 MB. Published on Jul 18, 2016.


Historic American Roof Trusses
118.1 KB. Published on Jul 18, 2016.


Timber Frame Joinery Details
91.01 KB. Published on Jul 18, 2016.


King Post Truss Joinery Analysis
1.55 MB. Published on Aug 8, 2013.


Investigation of Through-Tenon Keys on the Tensile Strength of Mortise and Tenon Joints
6.88 MB. Published on Jun 1, 2011.


Detailing Timber Connections Dimensional Change Considerations_Jim DeStefano
254.06 KB. Published on Feb 18, 2004.


Capacity of Pegged Mortise and Tenon Joinery _ Miller and Schmidt
1.26 MB. Published on Feb 8, 2004.


Behavior of Traditional Timber Frame Structures Subjected to Lateral Load _ Erikson and Schmidt
5.63 MB. Published on Aug 22, 2003.


Load Duration and Seasoning Effects on Mortise and Tenon Joints_Schmidt and Scholl
765.61 KB. Published on Aug 2, 2000.


Design Considerations for Mortise and Tenon Connections _Schmidt and Daniels
484.86 KB. Published on Apr 5, 1999.


Timber frame tension joinery_Schmidt and MacKay
739.4 KB. Published on Sep 27, 1997.


 
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Interpretation and appropriate use of the information presented in this Library is the responsibility of the user. By downloading the documents, you agree that you have read and understand that neither The Timber Framers Guild or Timber Framers Engineering Council nor its members assume any responsibility for the information contained in this library of documents or liability from its use.